Aging and protein synthesis
Aging is a major risk factor for disease and death but what is the cause of aging? Despite many theories it is still unknown. What we know is that as we age our body produces fewer proteins that have a large number of important functions in our body. For example:

Proteins are vital to cell division, which is necessary for growth, reproduction and healing.
Many proteins keep everything working right by regulating chemical reactions. Examples include enzymes, hormones, blood clotting substances, even receptors in the eyes.
Protein is essential for the immune system to defend against foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses.
Proteins help to transport other nutrients around the body by binding to them and then releasing them when and where they are needed.
Protein helps to regulate and maintain a proper fluid balance. This helps to maintain proper blood pressure and even lubricate eyes.
Certain proteins serve a major structural role in tissues such as muscle and skin and even provide the matrix for bones and teeth.

Basically, our bodies make thousands of specific proteins that serve important roles in everyday functioning— in fact, the human body is about 45% protein on a dry matter basis.
As aging is associated with a decline in the synthesis of protein, it is logical to assume that if the synthesis is restored aging can be slowed down. As it turns out this assumption is correct. Scientists V. Khavinson and V. Morozov have found a way to repair protein production and have achieved incredible results. Using the following methods can increase lifespan by 20-40%.